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Stack of Books

Cherries
oil on canvas
22 x 20 in
1981

Penny Machines
oil on canvas
23¾ x 29¾ in
1961

Stack of Books
oil on canvas
30 x 24 in
n.d.

Seven Suckers
oil on canvas
19 x 23 in
1970

Twin Jackpots
oil on canvas
30 x 46 in
1962

Ties
oil on canvas
20 x 26 in
1980

Cake Slices
oil on canvas
20 x 16 in
n.d.

Where public relations wins

Good editorial cannot be bought, only influenced, making one marketing discipline increasingly important – Public Relations & Public Affairs. The growth of the internet and the growing sophistication of polling techniques play to the traditional strengths of Public Relations & Public Affairs, where relationships need to be built with opinion formers. Blogs, social networks and customer websites are a new form of editorial, as important if not more important than The New York Times. Because they are fast and have a more intimate relationship with their readers, blogs can cause disproportionate harm to a brand – or conversely bring great benefit. PR can influence them in a way paid-for advertising cannot.

PR will never replace traditional advertising but in the new electronic media, it is a measurable way of building a brand. Chinese and Indian manufacturers will need its services to bring their products to the West, as they go beyond being makers of cheap generic goods to creators of value-added brands. Equally, burgeoning global powers will need PR to smooth their ways to places of influence in the world. And the financial institutions blamed for the credit crunch will need to buff up their tarnished reputations.

In all these cases, PR will help, as we have seen over the past five years with the continued growth of our Public Relations & Public Affairs businesses.

Percentage of fortune
Source: Burson-Marsteller
Global companies social media
Source: Burson-Marsteller
Global companies four platforms
Source: Burson-Marsteller
Unique audience
Source: Compete.com

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